Putting faith into practice through giving

June 19, 2013

Our new Liberty Leader focuses on Jim Anthony, a businessman in commercial real estate who uses his wealth to help others and advance the values he holds dear: For Jim Anthony, it all began in 1983. An MBA graduate from Duke University, Jim had spent the last four years working as a brokerage professional in the San Fernando Valley of Los Angeles when he decided to move his family back to North Carolina. He took a job with a local commercial real estate firm, Carolantic Realty, and that’s when he “woke up” to the importance of personal philanthropy. “Up until then, I was politically disconnected,” Jim said. “In my Christian faith, I was nominal. Then Steve Stroud, my boss, showed me the importance of investing in our community, both through political involvement and personal giving.” That, plus some financial wake-up calls in the last real estate collapse in the late 1980s, set Jim on a three-decade course of philanthropic commitment, consisting of political...

Remembering Gov. Jim Holshouser

Former Gov. Jim Holshouser — one of only two Republicans elected chief executive in North Carolina in the 20th century — passed away Monday at the age of 78. A report from WRAL-TV outlines the impact of Holshouser's time in office: Holshouser was only 38 when he was elected governor in 1972, becoming the first Republican to lead the state since the 1800s. The Democratic Party controlled the General Assembly at the time, but Holshouser worked with lawmakers to expand public school kindergartens statewide, establish health clinics in rural areas not served by local physicians and expand the state parks system. “James Holshouser was more than a friend and mentor, he was a genuine leader,” Gov. Pat McCrory said in a statement. “His passing is not only a loss for the state of North Carolina but for the countless number of people who were personally touched by his guidance and kindness." Holshouser helped McCrory transition into the Governor's Office after his victory in...

John Hood: Medicaid costs are exploding

June 5, 2013

Categories: Public Policy

In his Daily Journal column from Monday, John Locke Foundation President John Hood discusses the rising costs of Medicaid in North Carolina: During the past year, North Carolinians have heard many things about Obamacare, Medicaid, and health care reform that turned out to be untrue. For example: • North Carolinians were told that regardless of whether the state set up its own Obamacare exchange or allowed the federal government to do so, state government would have to fund the exchange’s operating costs. This claim was false. • They were told that unless North Carolina accepted the Medicaid expansion authorized by Obamacare, some 500,000 North Carolinians would be shut out of subsidized health coverage and remain uninsured. This claim was false. • They were told that if North Carolina took a pass on Medicaid expansion, our tax dollars would just go to subsidize more health care spending in other states. This claim was false. • They were told that North...

[VIDEO] The economic consequences of changing family structure

May 29, 2013

Values & Capitalism, an initiative of the American Enterprise Institute, has released a new book discussing the economic consequences of breakdown in family structure in the United States: Since the 1950s, divorces and out-of-wedlock births in America have risen dramatically. This has significantly affected the economic well-being of the country’s most vulnerable populations. In "Home Economics: The Consequences of Changing Family Structure, Nick Schulz argues that serious consideration of the consequences of changing family structure is sorely missing from conversations about American economic policy and politics. Apprehending a complete picture of this country’s economic condition will be impossible if poverty, income inequality, wealth disparities, and unemployment alone are taken into consideration, claims Schulz. Click here to purchase the book, or watch the video below. Here is an excerpt from the first chapter, available in PDF download: This project was...

Raising a flag on a hill to end forced annexation

May 7, 2013

Categories: Public Policy

Our new Achiever Spotlight tells the story of Cathy Heath, an anti-forced annexation activist who has worked as a volunteer with Americans for Prosperity N.C. and the Civitas Institute: Raising a flag on a hill — that’s the word picture Cathy Heath uses to describe her decade-long fight to reform North Carolina’s annexation laws. Involuntary, or “forced,” annexation has long been a political hot potato in North Carolina. Cathy’s quest for reform began in 2001 when the Town of Cary threatened to annex her subdivision in northwest Wake County forcibly. The change would have meant higher taxes for Cathy and her neighbors. They didn’t want town services or the tax bill accompanying them. Cathy began researching the annexation issue and found that it was a significant problem in North Carolina and across the country. She became co-director of the Stop N.C. Annexation coalition, a grassroots effort to end forced annexation. “There were many communities across...

Does your country encourage or discourage generous giving?

April 26, 2013

To what degree does your country respect the freedom to be generous? That's the question examined in a new pilot study from the Center for Global Prosperity at the Hudson Institute. The new research explores the climate of philanthropic freedom in 13 nations. The study (PDF download) uses a variety of metrics — including the ease of creating philanthropic organizations and tax policies that either encourage or discourage individual generosity — to determine the level of restrictions in each country. The Hudson Institute's index of philanthropic freedom puts the Netherlands, the United States, Sweden, Japan, Australia, and Mexico at the top. Turkey, Russia, Egypt, and China round out the bottom. The study concludes: Many of the high scoring nations are also high income countries, reflecting the long history of philanthropy and civil society in these countries. Additionally, some emerging economies scored high also, reflecting an improving environment that is conducive to...

The perils of ignoring the relationship between family stability and economics

April 19, 2013

Categories: Public Policy

Is the health of the family related to the health of the economy? John Hood, President of the John Locke Foundation, gives some examples of why the answer is "Yes" in his new daily journal column: In my latest column for Business North Carolina magazine, I argue that policymakers who seek to make North Carolina’s economy more competitive can’t afford to ignore the seemingly unrelated issue of family stability. “Economic and social policy often follow separate tracks,” I write. “But when it comes to the health of the family, the tracks converge. While people can continue to disagree about the religious or moral foundations of family life, there is simply no room for debate about the larger consequences of family stability. Higher rates of divorce and out-of-wedlock births raise the cost of government and, thus, act as a drag on economic growth.” Strong families are the building blocks of strong communities, and thus strong economies. Their economic role as...