Raleigh Children’s Business Fair Makes Local Headlines

September 12, 2016

Children become own bosses, peddling their wares for profit BY MANDY LOCKE mlocke@newsobserver.com September 10, 2016 Nine-year-old Lauryn Hill knows a thing or two about fashion. Mix and match, buy versatile garments, embrace color. She’s even been blogging about fashion for a year. On Saturday, Lauryn had the chance to merge her passion and sensibilities with commerce. The result: $2 flip-flops decorated with pompoms and tassels. Lauryn was one of about 40 Triangle youth who tried their hands at running a small business over the weekend. They gathered in North Hills Mall Commons to do one of the most American endeavors: selling their products for profits. They peddled everything from brownies to bracelets, bubblegum machines to bedazzled barrettes. All with this hope: walking away with more money than they spent. “I’ve been hoping to open up a savings account,” said Lauryn. “Maybe I’ll make enough today to make that happen.” The fair’s concept...

Supporting a dynamic marketplace for human prosperity

March 4, 2014

On Feb. 12, the Philanthropy Roundtable and the John William Pope Foundation co-hosted an event in Raleigh titled “How and Why Free-Market Public-Policy Donors Give to Charities That Help the Poor.” The transcript below is of a speech given by Alicia Manning, Director of New Citizen Programs at the Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation The Roundtable has so eloquently set the stage for this discussion by reinforcing, through the very existence of its Economic Opportunity program, the idea that humans thrive where liberty and personal responsibility coexist. I’m not sure whether former Professor Riggs would agree that what I’m about to suggest can be properly considered economic theory, but I will posit an idea nonetheless: a society that is both free and humane is a duality that requires both a supply of free people and a demand for freedom. Philanthropy can work on both sides of this equation. The extent to which American citizens are currently free is obviously open...

Why should free-market philanthropists give to charities that help the poor?

On Feb. 12, the Philanthropy Roundtable and the John William Pope Foundation co-hosted an event in Raleigh titled "How and Why Free-Market Public-Policy Donors Give to Charities That Help the Poor." The transcript below is of a speech given by David Riggs, Executive Vice President of the Pope Foundation, during the conference. Thanks to all of you for coming here on this wintery day to learn a little more about an important project of the Philanthropy Roundtable, “How and Why Free-Market Public Policy Donors Give to Charities that Help the Poor.” The Pope Foundation has been a supporter of the Philanthropy Roundtable for many years and we hope that you will find their activities and expertise to be of interest, too. My goal here is to set the stage about why free market public policy donors give to charities that help the poor. I’d like to begin by briefly describing some of the Pope Foundation’s history. The Foundation has a long history of giving to public policy...

Piereson: The typical ‘1 percenter’ today works for a salary, and not in the financial industry

February 18, 2014

The Manhattan Institute's James Piereson uses his Wall Street Journal column today to dispel a few myths surrounding the wealthiest 1 percent in the United States. To judge by media reports, most Americans would assume that the wealthiest 1 percent are found mainly in the financial sector and reap most of their income from capital gains. But Piereson writes that "1 percenters" consist "primarily of salaried executives at nonfinancial businesses (30%) and secondarily of doctors (14%), people working in finance (13%) and lawyers (8%). Among the 'super rich' in the top 0.1% (about 110,000 households), the distribution still favors business executives (41%) over people in finance (18%)." These wealthiest Americans depend heavily on salaries, not capital gains: In 2010 the top 1% earned 36% of their incomes from salaries and wages (what the CBO calls labor income), 22% from businesses, farms and partnerships, and just 19% from capital gains. The majority of their income would...

The Fund for American Studies: Internship opportunities in Washington, D.C.

February 17, 2014

The Fund for American Studies (TFAS) is accepting applications for its summer 2014 academic internship programs held in Washington, D.C. Since 1967, TFAS has been putting students on the path to leadership and influence through its summer and semester "Live. Learn. Intern." programs. TFAS summer institutes include a guaranteed internship placement, courses for credit at George Mason University taught by outstanding faculty, housing in furnished apartments in Washington, D.C. just blocks from the White House, guest lectures, site briefings, professional development activities, and social events. Programs are offered in the following areas of study: Public Policy & Economics International Affairs & Economics Business & Government Affairs Journalism, Communications & Public Relations Community Service & Nonprofit Sector Generous scholarship awards are available to residents of North Carolina through the support of the John William Pope Foundation. ...

Conservative social justice

February 10, 2014

"Conservatives need a social justice agenda of their own." So writes Arthur Brooks, president of the Washington D.C.-based American Enterprise Institute, in a new article for Commentary magazine. Brooks main question is this: How can conservatives overcome the widespread perception that they care little for the poor, while progressives care significantly? The transformation begins, Brooks writes, by articulating a conservative social-justice agenda: Conservative leaders owe it to their followers and the vulnerable to articulate a positive social-justice agenda for the right. It must be tangible, practical, and effective. And it must start with the following question: What do the most vulnerable members of society need? This means asking the poor themselves. Brooks builds his case on three pillars: Moral transformation: Fostering the values of faith, family, community, and work. Material relief: Encouraging individual charity and building a social safety net that...

[VIDEO] Specialization: Because we can’t be good at everything

February 6, 2014

Check out this instructive and humorous video from LearnLiberty.org on the importance of specialization and trade: ...