Some UNC students pray, others learn about sex toys

April 18, 2013

Categories: Education

The College Fix blogs today about a stark contrast at UNC-Chapel Hill — one group of students committed to prayer while another group participated in a campus sex workshop: On the evening of April 10, several students sat tucked away in an Episcopal church just north of the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill. Their heads were bowed; their thoughts – ethereal. The students were taking part in a weeklong “UNC 24/7 Prayer” at the university, an annual observance designed to lift up lives, families, careers – and the campus community – to the Lord. About 250 students signed up for one-hour prayer slots that launched April 4 at 9:30 p.m. and ran day and night through April 11. Although there was no official “theme” for the week, one Bible verse repeated in both email invitations and on handouts for students inside the church read:  “I will set my eyes on them for good, and I will bring them back to this land. I will build them up, and not tear them...

Luiz Zingales speaks at N.C. State

March 12, 2013

On Wednesday, April 3, 2013, economist Luigi Zingales delivered the N.C. State John W. Pope lecture on his new book, Capitalism for the People: Recapturing the Lost Genius of American Prosperity.  Zingales is the Robert C. McCormack Professor of Entrepreneurship and Finance at the Booth School of Business at the University of Chicago. The event was free and open to the public and held at Nelson Hall Auditorium.   Book Summary Born in Italy, University of Chicago economist Luigi Zingales witnessed firsthand the consequences of high inflation and unemployment—paired with rampant nepotism and cronyism—on a country’s economy. This experience profoundly shaped his professional interests, and in 1988 he arrived in the United States, armed with a political passion and the belief that economists should not merely interpret the world, but should change it for the better. In A Capitalism for the People, Zingales makes a forceful, philosophical, and at times...

Pope lecture: ‘The seven principles of economic freedom’

March 11, 2013

This year's Pope Lecture at the Clemson Institute for the Study of Capitalism focused on the seven principles of economic freedom. Lawrence W. Reed, President of the Foundation for Economic Education, delivered the lecture. Click the video below to watch the speech. ...

How to choose a college, 101

February 20, 2013

Categories: Education

Given the declining value of a college degree and the increasing costs, many students today are faced with tough questions about how best to choose an institution of higher learning. The James G. Martin Center for Academic Renewal (known as the Pope Center for Higher Education when this piece was printed in 2013) has some solid recommendations in this article: It may come as a surprise to you, but the biggest single test of whether a college is worth attending is not its ranking, its placement record, or the average salary of its graduates. It's whether it treats you like an adult. Don’t expect a college to help you become an intelligent adult and a responsible citizen if it does not treat you like one. Many colleges and universities will not treat you like an adult—someone who can think and act independently—but instead they will treat you like a child in need of sermonizing and supervision while they severely restrict what you are allowed to say and think. To begin...

Shaw: McCrory stated ‘an uncomfortable truth’ on higher education

February 5, 2013

Gov. Pat McCrory found himself in a firestorm of controversy a week ago when he said on a radio talk show that North Carolina should put greater emphasis on college majors that have a higher chance of leading to jobs. Some saw it as an attack on the liberal arts. But writing in The Wall Street Journal, Jane Shaw, president of the John William Pope Center for Higher Education Policy, argues that Gov. McCrory "stated an uncomfortable truth" about higher education: The truth is: Elite universities, such as the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, are doing a disservice when they lead students into majors with few, if any, job prospects. Stating such truths doesn't mean you're antagonistic to the liberal arts. Yet some, always eager for a fight, misconstrued the governor's comments as a call for abolishing liberal-arts education in favor of vocational training. UNC-Chapel Hill geography professor Altha Cravey said the governor "was not elected to decide what has...

The enduring quality of charity

October 26, 2012

Philanthropy Daily contributor Scott Walter tells the story of Jared, a young man gifted in art and creative writing who didn't begin to thrive until his parents enrolled him in Heights, a single-sex school. Jared's troubles as a young man weren't solved by the National Institutes of Health, medications, or even his parents, but by a reframed learning environment. Walter ties the piece together to show the lasting value of charitable investment. Jared's story inspired his doctor, Leonard Sax, to become a champion for single-sex education, and the investors who support the Heights school have had a major impact on many lives: The Heights has the charitable mission of helping boys grow into good men. Its charity toward Jared changed his life dramatically. Then that change planted a seed in Dr. Sax and changed his life. The doctor’s changed life in turn led him to help others change thousands more lives ... This demonstration of the power of charity brings to mind an essay by...

Philanthropy Daily: Some colleges chafe, but restricted gifts prove beneficial

October 18, 2012

Should colleges and universities always have the final say in how gifts are used? Philanthropy Daily examines that question in this article, arguing for the reasonableness of philanthropists restricting their gifts for certain purposes in higher education: When donors give to a general pot, the people in charge will keep directing money to certain places. They will pick the winners and because the winners get more money, they will keep winning. But donors can provide an outsider’s perspective. They can say that other causes are valuable, causes that are getting overlooked. It’s not surprising that when people have more say about where their money goes, they’re more willing to give. A representative of LDS Philanthropies, an arm of the Mormon church that encourages large charitable donations, told me that they have adopted a similar strategy. There are other reasons that donors to higher education want to restrict their giving. Namely they have taken to heart the lessons...