Pope lecture: ‘The seven principles of economic freedom’

March 11, 2013

This year's Pope Lecture at the Clemson Institute for the Study of Capitalism focused on the seven principles of economic freedom. Lawrence W. Reed, President of the Foundation for Economic Education, delivered the lecture. Click the video below to watch the speech. ...

How to choose a college, 101

February 20, 2013

Categories: Education

Given the declining value of a college degree and the increasing costs, many students today are faced with tough questions about how best to choose an institution of higher learning. The James G. Martin Center for Academic Renewal (known as the Pope Center for Higher Education when this piece was printed in 2013) has some solid recommendations in this article: It may come as a surprise to you, but the biggest single test of whether a college is worth attending is not its ranking, its placement record, or the average salary of its graduates. It's whether it treats you like an adult. Don’t expect a college to help you become an intelligent adult and a responsible citizen if it does not treat you like one. Many colleges and universities will not treat you like an adult—someone who can think and act independently—but instead they will treat you like a child in need of sermonizing and supervision while they severely restrict what you are allowed to say and think. To begin...

Shaw: McCrory stated ‘an uncomfortable truth’ on higher education

February 5, 2013

Gov. Pat McCrory found himself in a firestorm of controversy a week ago when he said on a radio talk show that North Carolina should put greater emphasis on college majors that have a higher chance of leading to jobs. Some saw it as an attack on the liberal arts. But writing in The Wall Street Journal, Jane Shaw, president of the John William Pope Center for Higher Education Policy, argues that Gov. McCrory "stated an uncomfortable truth" about higher education: The truth is: Elite universities, such as the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, are doing a disservice when they lead students into majors with few, if any, job prospects. Stating such truths doesn't mean you're antagonistic to the liberal arts. Yet some, always eager for a fight, misconstrued the governor's comments as a call for abolishing liberal-arts education in favor of vocational training. UNC-Chapel Hill geography professor Altha Cravey said the governor "was not elected to decide what has...

The enduring quality of charity

October 26, 2012

Philanthropy Daily contributor Scott Walter tells the story of Jared, a young man gifted in art and creative writing who didn't begin to thrive until his parents enrolled him in Heights, a single-sex school. Jared's troubles as a young man weren't solved by the National Institutes of Health, medications, or even his parents, but by a reframed learning environment. Walter ties the piece together to show the lasting value of charitable investment. Jared's story inspired his doctor, Leonard Sax, to become a champion for single-sex education, and the investors who support the Heights school have had a major impact on many lives: The Heights has the charitable mission of helping boys grow into good men. Its charity toward Jared changed his life dramatically. Then that change planted a seed in Dr. Sax and changed his life. The doctor’s changed life in turn led him to help others change thousands more lives ... This demonstration of the power of charity brings to mind an essay by...

Philanthropy Daily: Some colleges chafe, but restricted gifts prove beneficial

October 18, 2012

Should colleges and universities always have the final say in how gifts are used? Philanthropy Daily examines that question in this article, arguing for the reasonableness of philanthropists restricting their gifts for certain purposes in higher education: When donors give to a general pot, the people in charge will keep directing money to certain places. They will pick the winners and because the winners get more money, they will keep winning. But donors can provide an outsider’s perspective. They can say that other causes are valuable, causes that are getting overlooked. It’s not surprising that when people have more say about where their money goes, they’re more willing to give. A representative of LDS Philanthropies, an arm of the Mormon church that encourages large charitable donations, told me that they have adopted a similar strategy. There are other reasons that donors to higher education want to restrict their giving. Namely they have taken to heart the lessons...

Campbell University breaks ground on John W. Pope Jr. Convocation Center

September 10, 2012

Categories: Education

Art Pope joined other philanthropists and community leaders on a sunny day in 2006 in Buies Creek, North Carolina, to break ground on the Campbell University convocation center named after his late brother, John. Campbell has more details in a press release: Campbell University celebrated the groundbreaking for the John W. Pope Jr. Convocation Center September 1st. Donors, administrators, and community leaders took up ceremonial gold shovels to turn the dirt at the site, located near the intersection of Main Street and Leslie Campbell Avenue. The 109,000 square foot facility is scheduled to be completed by the fall of 2008. It will house a 3,000 seat arena, Sports Hall of Fame lobby, hospitality suite, practice gymnasium, wrestling practice room, and basketball-volleyball-wrestling offices and locker rooms. There will also be a 5,000 square foot student fitness center with a stand alone entrance for student convenience. A project anticipated for decades, the John W. Pope Jr....

New center at Duke University studies the history of economic theories

Categories: Education

Duke Today reports on the arrival of a new academic center on Duke University’s campus devoted to studying the historical juncture between politics and economics. The academic center was made possible by grants from the John William Pope Foundation: The current economic turbulence has prompted news reports filled with terms such as fiscal stimulus, monetary policy and market stabilization. Such concepts are easy to take for granted, but they represent ideas developed and debated about over the last 300 years. A new center at Duke studies the history of these economic theories.  "We have these popular images and sound bites about what famous economists like Adam Smith and Karl Marx thought, but what were they really saying, in the context of the time that they were saying it?" said Bruce Caldwell, the director of the newly created Center for the History of Political Economy (HOPE) at Duke. "Typically, many of the issues that they viewed as important then are issues that are being...